Welcome to Convergence Culture

Welcome to Convergence Culture

Reduced to its most core elements, this book is about the relationship between three concepts – media convergence, participatory culture, and collective intelligence….

http://henryjenkins.org/blog/2006/06/welcome_to_convergence_culture.html

Reflective Remediation as Critical Design Strategy: Lessons from László Moholy-Nagy and Olafur Eliasson

Reflective Remediation as Critical Design Strategy: Lessons from László Moholy-Nagy and Olafur Eliasson

Reflective remediation is an important component of contemporary media theory, which emphasises the creative efforts of avant-garde artists and designers to shape the evolution of media in a critical way. However, the critical capacity of reflective remediations may be compromised by commercial dynamics or conventions, such as the celebration of ‘reflec-tivity for reflectivity’s sake’ that aims to construct an auratic experience for viewers. Because reflectivity is a critical media practice, it is vital to investigate reflective remediations in tandem with the critical intensions and creative visions of artists and designers. We investigate the critical media practices of the Bauhaus master, László Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946) who explored the concept of ‘productive creativity’, according to which creative experimentation should lead to design knowledge, redefining the relationship between what is known and unknown. We then scrutinise the artistic practice of the Icelandic-Danish contemporary artist Olafur Eliasson (b.1967), who contextualises reflectivity as an embodied experience , in terms of what he calls ‘frictional encounters’. When applied together, the two concepts enhance our understanding of reflective remediation as a critical design strategy.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/334122137_Reflective_Remediation_as_Critical_Design_Strategy_Lessons_from_Laszlo_Moholy-Nagy_and_Olafur_Eliasson

Manovich and Remediation

Manovich and Remediation

In Software Takes Command, Manovich challenges Bolter and Grusin’s remediation theory, claiming that computers surpass the mere remediation of previous mediums. Instead, the computer is “‘a metamedium’ whose content is ‘a wide range of already existing and not-yet-invented media‘” (105; italics original). In addition, computers provide the ability to translate various mediums into other mediums (e.g. audio into visualizations) and to control the viewing of a medium’s content.

https://blogs.commons.georgetown.edu/cctp-748-spring2015/2015/04/01/manovich-and-remediation/

Digital Creativity: A Survey of the term

Digital Creativity: A Survey of the term

The analysis that we developed in our task for the project Invisibilia confirms that the term digital creativity represents a disperse notion in which a number of different definitions developed along last decades are merged. The dispersion of the concept emerges from the bibliometric analysis that has used a set of seminal essays and articles and has created a citation database. Nevertheless our analysis reveals that the discussion about the notion is still gemmed out of a core of pivotal figures in the field of structuralism, mass-mediology and new media. On the other hand this seems to lead to the conclusion that the digital creativity as a field is less influenced by computer science scholars and still lacks of a specific canon.

https://journals.openedition.org/mimesis/688

Exploring digital remediation in support of personal reflection

Exploring digital remediation in support of personal reflection

Increasingly our digital traces are providing new opportunities for self-reflection. In particular, social media (SM) data can be used to support self-reflection, but to what extent is this affected by the form in which SM data is presented? Here, we present three studies where we work with individuals to transform or remediate their SM data into a physical book, a photographic triptych and a film. We describe the editorial decisions that take place as part of the remediation process and show how the transformations allow users to reflect on their digital identity in new ways. We discuss our findings in terms of the application of Goffman’s (1959) self-presentation theories to the SM context, showing that a fluid rather than bounded interpretation of our social media spaces may be appropriate. We argue that remediation can contribute to the understanding of digital self and consider the design implications for new SM systems designed to support self-reflection.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1071581917301404

Remediation

Remediation

“Remediation” is a media theory which focuses on the incorporation or representation of one medium in another medium. According to the book Remediation: Understanding New Media by J. David Bolter and Richard A. Grusin, remediation is a defining characteristic of new digital media because digital media is constantly remediating its predecessors. This theory states that the media’s existence is related to other media forms; it is fundamentally comparative and assumes that media does not possess autonomous formal or technical specificity, but that it exists only in relation to other media forms and practices. Remediation may or may not present a connection to the original source. The theory also argues that new media does not present a historical break or rupture with the past, but rather it defines their newness through the refashioning of the present media forms.

http://webservices.itcs.umich.edu/mediawiki/DigitalRhetoricCollaborative/index.php/Remediation